Budget Briefs | Situation Analysis of Children

Current Situation

Mozambique is third fastest growing non-oil economy  in Sub Saharan Africa, third lowest human developmentOver the past two decades, Mozambique has experienced remarkably strong economic growth, ranking amongst the fastest growing economies in the world, averaging 7.5% a year. Projections for the next decade are of continued high growth.

Striking progress for children has taken place in this context: a large and steady reduction in under-5 mortality, a huge expansion in enrolment in both primary and secondary education, increasing rates of utilization of improved drinking water sources and improved sanitation facilities, the expansion of testing and treatment of HIV/AIDS (and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV) and improvements in the coverage of services such as birth registration and social protection. Yet, Mozambique remains one of the poorest and least developed countries in the world, having some of the worst social indicators.

Progress for children depends heavily on the extent to which State resources are used to promote equitable access to quality social services and human capital development. One of Mozambique’s immediate priorities is to ensure that future economic growth is inclusive, with benefits shared more broadly among the population.

This begins with solid data and analysis on the situation of children and disparities, it is built on effective and focused planning to address children’s rights, and it is able to secure adequate investments in children.

The Social Policy and Planning, Information and Monitoring (SPPIM) section of UNICEF Mozambique works to build the case for inclusive growth and pro-child investment. It supports knowledge generation, advocacy and policy engagement, as well as the development of national capacity to use strategic information in planning, budgeting and policy-making in all sectors that are key to the realisation of children’s rights.

To achieve the desired outcomes, SPPIM works closely with the Ministry of Economy and Finance, the National Institute of Statistics (INE) the   and civil society, at national and local level.   Furthermore, the programme works in close collaboration with international cooperation partners as well as the International Financial Institutions, like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and other United Nations agencies.

What we are doing

1

Inclusive Growth and Public Finance for Children

UNICEF works for the prioritization of children in national and sub-national plans and budgets. For such, it supports i) generation of evidence on the financing of key social sectors for children, ii) transparency of and participation in planning and budgeting processes, iii) scrutiny and advocacy for investment in children.

2

Research and Data

As a knowledge leader for children, UNICEF supports the collection, analysis, use and dissemination high quality data on the situation of children to support adequate planning and investment. This entails generating evidence on the situation of children, but also strengthening capacity to do so at national and subnational levels.

3

Planning and Monitoring

Strengthen UNICEF and government capacities for programming, planning and development, as well as decentralized monitoring of programme implementations.

Results

Invest more and better in children

UNICEF contributes to the debate on inclusive growth and public investment in children in Mozambique through the production of Budget Briefs, concise and simplified analyses of budget trends in social sectors. These have become strong reference documents for diverse stakeholders such as donors, CSOs, the media, the parliament, and government institutions

An important piece of knowledge and advocacy for informing plans and budgets is the study “Invest more and better in children: Perspectives for improved financing of the social sectors in Mozambique,” which analyses the perspectives for improving the financing of crucial social sectors for the well-being and development of children in Mozambique and can inform Government and partners in improving investment in children.

Situation Analysis of Children in Mozambique 2014

UNICEF, in close collaboration with the government and partners, carried out an analysis of theSituation of Children in Mozambique 2014 to assess the pace of progress in the realisation of Mozambican children’s rights. The report is the most comprehensive and up-to-date information on the lives of children in the country and is being used as an important tool for advocacy for the prioritization of children.

UNICEF continues to support the work of the National Institute of Statistics and the National School of Statistics with the aim of strengthening social sector data collection and analysis in Mozambique, to better address disparities and inequities faced by children.  Much of this work centres on systems strengthening at national and decentralised levels

UNICEF supports capacity building at the provincial level, and over the past few years has trained hundreds of Government technicians on Results-Based Management, on generation, analysis, use and dissemination of statistics on children and women, and of journalists.

 With partner support, UNICEF has focused on the development of tools for effective data collection and analysis in support equity-based planning and monitoring, with a particular focus on decentralized data analysis and evidence-based planning.

NewsReel

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